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post33The OMA Program focuses on your career success and it begins with creating a vision and a plan. Our new, innovative and structured approach to career success, life fulfillment, and balance, creates measurable benefits for individuals and organizations.

These programs are designed to assist you in answering questions key to your career success and help you if you want to continue your education. They are in line with college requirements and are endorsed by adult education organizations that help people prepare for the GED exam. As you answer these questions, you achieve greater focus toward your future.

This focus creates the road map to increased career success, decreased stress and increased balance. We offer programs that meet your needs. From individual coaching to assessments and workshops, all are designed to fit your schedule and achieve ultimate career success.

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06_13_2014_border_crisis-jpg__800x600_q85_cropOne at a time, Maria Vasquez’s children crossed the treacherous border into the U.S. They were fleeing violence and poverty in Guatemala, and lured to New Jersey with the prospect of getting reunified with their mother in Union County and start a new life. Two of Maria’s children crossed the frontier all by themselves, alone, and as unaccompanied minors. The children got caught by U.S. Border Patrol officers, who sent them on to New Jersey, where they soon encountered a new barrier: sign up for public school!

Maria Vasquez’ children are two of the more than 5000 unaccompanied minors from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador that were placed with sponsor families in New Jersey by the federal government since end 2013. An estimated seventy children are staying in various communities in Monmouth County, but the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement is not reporting counties where under fifty migrant children got resettled, such as Ocean County.

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pathNot so long ago, the Maplewood Memorial Library received the largest grant ever in the Library’s history. The grant ($72,053) came from he pilot program of the Adult Literacy & Community Library Partnership (New Jersey’s Department of Labor & Workforce Development), and is a great help to fund the Library’s ESL (English as a second language) program. The Maplewood Memorial Library library is using the grant for 4 level-1 ESL courses and 2 conversation groups. The courses are offered in partnership with the Passaic and Essex counties Literacy Volunteers of America (LVA) chapters, and are available at no cost.

People who don’t speak English encounter serious disadvantages when they apply for a job, when they want to use a computer, or when writing their name, resumes, or filling out forms. People who are not able to speak and communicate in English have greater disadvantages in the workforce community and cannot be part of their community like people who do command the language.

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literacycollagemergedLiteracy Volunteers are believing that supported and well-trained volunteers can be highly effective teachers of adults.  Literacy Volunteers provide free, individualized student-focused instruction in basic literacy & English language capabilities. Literacy Volunteers of East Bay (LVEB) includes some 80 volunteers, 1 administrative director, and Board of Directors of 8 members. LVEB is serving around 80 adult learners every year through the organization’s group class leaders and well-trained tutors. Most students receive tutoring on an individual basis, but the organization also provide group instruction for local organizations or businesses who have a group of people that needs their services. Tutors are required to complete a training program of 15 hours and they continually are supported by a literacy specialist.

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download-44It won’t be long before several Howell Township seniors will be able to get help with gaining more independence by learning English. The Howell Senior Center is planning to provide an ESL (English as a Second Language) course starting early September. Melanie Decker, Director of the Senior Center, made clear that there is growing demand for this kind of service because the non-native speaking part of the population is increasing, and lack of transportation options make ESL lessons in Howell really needed.

The Howell Township Senior Center’s membership grows every day, says Decker, and over the last two years, we’ve seen an enormous increase in the amount of people who have only limited or no command of English, and as they don’t have adequate (if any) transportation options to attend an ESL class, our community’s seniors may feel even more alone and isolated. The Howell Senior Center is already offering transportation services for all of its members, so participants of the the ESL class (spearheaded by social worker Ann Albano) could avail themselves of this. at. The ESL class also comes with instruction in conversational skills, as they form the basis of any language course.

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mind-literacy-volunteers-fox-valley-sum13In 2015, almost 200 Literacy New Jersey students were granted U.S. citizenship, meaning they now can register to vote and do so for the first time, and become more active members in their communities.

Chin Vivian Hsieh is a 53 year old woman who immigrated to the U.S. six years ago from Taiwan, and among her most challenging experiences here was just walking into a shop and go to the checkout counter. She was scared, and thought people were saying ‘What’ya doing’, while they actually were saying ‘How’ya doing’. It was in fact this small misunderstanding, just one simple word, that made that she didn’t venture out on most days.

Finally, Hsieh joined a Literacy Volunteers group on English conversation and started to worked 1-on-1 with a tutor from Literacy New Jersey in Middlesex. It was only then that her life begun to change for the better. In 2015, Chin Vivian Hsieh became a U.S. citizen. She says she now wants to vote for the American presidency, and that she likes the American life, the possibilities, and the freedom.

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international-studentsAre you aware that if you mispronounce a student’s name, you are negating the student’s identity? Mispronouncing a student’s name many well be leading to resentment and anxiety which may lead to less academic progress. Pronouncing the name of a student correctly will help build a positive school culture and is only respectful to students and their families.

Over the last decades, we’ve seen a national increase regarding students’ overall graduation rates in the U.S., but the dropout rate for immigrant or foreign-born students remains above the 30% mark,  well over three times the dropout rate for white, U.S.-born students. We know that for many English Language Learners (ELL’s), the mispronunciation of their name is all too often the first of many setbacks they are experiencing in the classroom, while they are already very unlikely to work with a curriculum that respects or reflects their specific culture, or meet teachers who are speaking their native language.

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literacy-volunteers-volunteerBefore you can start working on things like syllables with any student, practically all literacy organizations will require you to attend an orientation & training program of some 10 to 20 hours.

Usually, the lessons and materials are provided for free, and the training takes generally place on evenings or weekend days. These training program are including subject areas such as goal setting, designing lesson plans, sensitivity training, dyslexia, and effective methods for teaching vocabulary, writing, preparing for the GED test and even writing a short GED essay.

Well, as we know that the majority of  illiterate adults were trying to cover up their inability to write and/or read for many years, sensitivity training elements were implemented to help you help them with any form of shame,  negativity about school, or frustration, that may come up during one of your tutoring sessions.

The instruction on your lesson plans will provide you with good ideas about how to structure your tutoring sessions.You’ll learn which workbooks to use in relation to a student’s reading level or perhaps learning disability, and the best ways to keep your tutoring accurate and lively.

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teacher-and-adult-students-in-free-english-as-a-second-language-esl-e5a8rm

I myself am an a non-native speaker of the English language, so I know from my own experience that writing in a foreign language is often challenging, and this is particularly true when it concerns academic work. A considerable portion of the available research reports and study material in our study field is providing numerous tips and suggestions on how we can help undergraduate non-native speakers and writers.

Having said that, graduate students somehow seem to be receiving far less attention regarding this subject in the provided literature. Still, non-native graduate students are facing an even greater number of challenges when it comes to writing their academic pieces, and my personal experiences have also made that very clear to me. Time to do some research.

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5730c7487e162-imageMany students from all over the world, when they’re looking to learn how to speak and read in English, are turning to The Easy English Times, a Napa-based newspaper publication.

For over two decades now, The Easy English Times has been a crucial ‘real-life’ resource for programs that are developed to enhance students’ literacy skills and English proficiency. The newspaper is an 8-page publication that’s printed and published 10 times per year and gets distributed all around the world.

The Easy English Times contains posts on current events, citizenship, and life skills, and it also includes posts written by and on students. The paper’s pieces appear at varying difficulty levels to accommodate an array of readers and students as wide as possible.

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